The Frye Company is the oldest continuously operating shoe making company in the U.S. Started by John A. Frye in 1863, Frye boots have been featured in fashion magazines such as “GQ,” “In Style” and “Seventeen.” Frye boots are lined with leather, feature full grain leather uppers and leather soles and are made with more than 190 individual steps. Frye is particularly well-known for its harness boots, called “Frye Wellingtons,” or “Jet Boots,” which were worn by U.S. soldiers during World War II. Wearing a pair of Frye boots is easy; the hardest part is selecting the pair that’s right for you.

Things You'll Need

Look along the sides and tops of your Frye boots. Unzip side zippers, if they are included on your boots, or loosen any laces included on the top of lower work boots. Loosen the tongue by pulling it up toward the top of the laces.

Sit down. Point your toes on your right foot down toward the floor. Hold the top sides of your right Frye boot gently between your thumbs and forefingers. Slide your foot slowly and carefully into your boot. Wiggle your foot and the boot back and forth to get your foot into over-the-knee style boots until your toes touch the sole. Press your heel firmly down into the sole of the boot. Repeat the process for your other foot.

Stand up. Pull the tops of the boot gently up toward your knee or hip if you are wearing over-the-knee style Frye boots. Zip up sides or pull laces tight and tie them, if applicable to the style of boot you are wearing. Repeat this process for the other foot.

Walk around in your new Frye boots for a day, giving the leather time to form to your feet. Return boots for a different size if they are still uncomfortably tight after two days of wear.

Tips

  • Frye boots do not need to be waterproofed, as waterproofing materials can change the color of the leather. If desired, you may purchase weatherproofing spray or leather conditioner from Frye to lightly clean and condition your boots. However, a damp cloth should clean dirt and muck off your boots satisfactorily.