Samantha Raja/Demand Media

That little orange box of baking soda isn't only good for deodorizing and taking up real estate in your fridge -- it also holds what you need to unclog pores that cause blackheads. Oil and grime get trapped in your pores; if they can't escape because dead skin cells are blocking the way, the curse of the blackheads begins. So when you find your face spotted with little black dots, don't break the bank on pricey products. Instead, banish blackheads and clear up your skin with the all-natural exfoliating powers of baking soda.

Samantha Raja/Demand Media

Wash your face as usual with your normal facial cleanser.

Samantha Raja/Demand Media

Pour 1 cup of water into a saucepan. Add a few sprigs of fresh rosemary or elder flowers. Bring the water to a boil on the stove, then take it off the heat. Let it cool down for 10 minutes. Drape a towel over your head to make a tent and hold your face over the pot -- at least 12 inches from the water surface -- for five minutes. Steaming helps to open up the pores, making it easier to remove the blackheads.

Samantha Raja/Demand Media

Mix 2 tablespoons of warm water and 2 tablespoons of baking soda into a small bowl. Stir the two ingredients with a spoon to make a thin paste.

Samantha Raja/Demand Media

Apply the mixture of baking soda and water to your skin using circular motions. Pay special attention to the areas of the face where blackheads have formed. Gently scrub for two to three minutes.

Samantha Raja/Demand Media

Rinse your face with warm water. Pat your face dry with a clean, dry towel and apply a facial moisturizer that is appropriate for your skin type.

Tip

Steam your face and scrub daily with baking soda and water until the blackheads are gone. To keep blackheads at bay, use the baking-soda scrub a few times a week in place of your normal facial cleanser.

Video of the Day

About the Author

Kimbry Parker

Kimbry Parker has been writing since 1998 and has published content on various websites. Parker has experience writing on a variety of topics such as health, parenting, home improvement and decorating. She is a graduate of Purdue University with a Bachelor of Arts in organizational communication.