Dry mustard, also called powdered mustard, will never give your foods that satisfying, small crunch that mustard seeds provide. But used in the right proportions, powdered mustard, like mustard seeds, adds a similar tangy heat to food.

Tips

Powdered mustard typically comes in hot and hotter varieties. Choose English dry mustard, which the Serious Eats website says is commonly sold in American under the Colman’s label, for the less hot version. Manufacturers make English dry mustard and also American yellow prepared mustard — the kind that already has water added — using mild yellow mustard seeds along with hotter brown seeds. Choose Chinese mustard, which typically says Chinese on the label, if you want more heat; it’s made with hot brown and black seeds.

How much dry mustard to substitute for mustard seeds depends on what kind of food you’re cooking:

  • Use 1 1/2 teaspoons of dry mustard for each 1 teaspoon of mustard seeds called for in your recipe when you make a brine for pickling vegetables. The brine will not be as clear as one made with just mustard seeds.
  • Substitute 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of dry mustard for each 1 teaspoon of mustard seeds in barbecue sauces, marinades and glazes for meat, poultry or fish and for curry dishes.
  • Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of dry mustard for each 1 teaspoon of mustard seeds to mayonnaise dressings for potato or macaroni salads.

  • For just a hint of mustardy tang, substitute 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of dry mustard for each 1 teaspoon of mustard seeds in a vinaigrette salad dressing.

Although dry mustard stays potent for two to three years according to the EatByDate website, it gives a boost to any number of foods you may already cook without the spice. Add from 1/2 to 1 teaspoon to:

Tips

To replace the crunch from tiny mustard seeds, add toasted sesame seeds or poppy seeds along with the dry mustard. These seeds add a new flavor component to your food, but give you a similar texture to mustard seeds.