The poblano pepper is a zesty vegetable used in many authentic Mexican recipes. It has gained popularity in the U.S. and is commonly found in many grocery stores across the nation. It is about as tall as a bell pepper, but much narrower and has a dark green color to it. The most popular way to prepare poblano peppers is to roast and peel it. The skin of a poblano pepper is waxy and, because of this, is most often removed from the pepper after roasting. Poblano peppers can also be dried (ancho chiles) and crushed into powder for flavoring recipes.


Things You'll Need


Preheat grill (charcoal or gas grill; this adds an additional smoky flavor to the poblano, but an oven broiler or flame from a gas-powered stove top can work also).

Treat the grate with vegetable oil or cooking oil spray.

Rinse the poblano peppers in cool water and do not dry them.

Lay the poblano peppers onto the grate and allow them to roast for five to six minutes (add or subtract time as needed). Flip the poblano with a pair of tongs to roast the other side for five to six minutes.

Remove the poblano peppers from the grill (or other heating source) when the skin is blistered and blackened.

Place the poblano pepper in a bowl and place a lid or plastic wrap to seal the steam inside the bowl. Keep the bowl at room temperature for at least 20 minutes.

Place the covered bowl in the refrigerator until the peppers are cool enough to handle. 15 to 30 minutes should be enough time.

Put on the latex gloves and peel the blister skin from the poblano pepper. It will come off easily.

Cut the tops off and remove the seeds and stems. Finish preparing the poblano pepper applying the recipe you have roasted them for.

Tips

  • Poblano peppers are commonly used for the popular Mexican dish Chile Rellenos (stuffed). Make a slice down the vertical side of the pepper and stuff with your favorite cheese. Chop and mince the poblano peppers and add to salsa, chili, quesadillas, rice or even corn chowder.