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Skin serums are topical liquids made from concentrated ingredients that target a specific skin concern. Lighter, more potent and more easily absorbed than creams, only a small amount is needed to achieve quick and intense results. Making your own firming and lifting serum is a cheap and all-natural alternative to buying expensive over-the-counter products, and can be as simple as blending together the right combination of carrier and essential oils known for their skin care benefits.

Eye Serum

Pour the jojoba oil into a sterilized dark glass bottle with a dropper top.

Add the chamomile and rose essential oils to the bottle using a clean pipette.

Stir with a toothpick or glass stirrer to blend the oils together.

Screw the dropper lid on tightly.

Face Serum

Combine the rosehip seed oil, camellia oil, evening primrose oil and vitamin E oil in a sterilized dark glass bottle with a dropper top.

Stir with a toothpick or glass stirrer to blend the oils together.

Screw the dropper lid on tightly.

Body Serum

Combine the hazelnut oil, jojoba oil and essential oils of cypress, grapefruit, cedarwood, orange, lemon and lime together in a sterilized dark glass bottle with a dropper top.

Stir with a toothpick or glass stirrer to blend the oils together.

Screw the dropper lid on tightly.

Tip

Shake your homemade serum before every use.

Apply your homemade serum to clean skin before moisturizer and makeup.

Eyes: Apply one drop of serum to a finger and gently smooth across the brow bone and under the eye. Do not apply to the eyelid.

Face: Massage five or six drops into the face and neck using small circular movements with your fingers.

Body: Massage five or six drops into cellulite-prone areas such as stomach, hips and thighs.

Keep your homemade serum refrigerated to preserve the essential oils. Use within six months.

Warning

Do not apply undiluted essential oils to the skin.

Citrus essential oils increase skin photosensitivity so should not be applied to skin that is going to be exposed to the sun.

Perform a skin sensitivity test before using a homemade recipe. Apply a small amount to a patch of skin and check for signs of a reaction, such as itching or redness, after 24 hours.

About the Author

Lisa Green

Based in London, Lisa Green has been writing entertainment and women’s lifestyle articles since 2004. She has contributed to the MyVillage and Glam networks and is the former editor of Entertainmentwise. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from De Montfort University and a City & Guilds journalism certificate from the City of Bristol College.