Raspberries, enjoyed for their sweet-yet-tart flavor, seem an obvious choice to use as a pie filling. Their small and numerous seeds, however, can be a distracting element from the flavor of the pie. To capture the flavor of the berries without the seeds, you must make a strained raspberry puree. This concentrated and seedless fruit sauce can then be used to make raspberry chiffon pie. This light and flavorful pie filling showcases the raspberry’s full flavor while delivering a melt-in-your-mouth texture.

Things You'll Need

Make the Puree

Pour the raspberries into the strainer. Press the berries into the walls of the strainer with a large spoon until all the juices have collected in the bowl and only the seeds remain in the strainer.

Discard the seeds and remove the strainer.

Stir in ¼ cup sugar and 1 tbsp. lemon juice into the macerated berries. Mix well and then set aside.

Make the Pie Filling

Pour the gelatin into the saucepan. Add ½ cup cold water and mix well. Let the mixture sit for 15 minutes.

Stir in ¾ cup sugar, egg yolks, the rest of the lemon juice and salt. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking continuously with a fork until boiling and creamy.

Pour the gelatin mixture into a mixing bowl. Stir in the raspberry puree. Cover with plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour, stirring every 10 minutes, until the mixture is partially set.

Beat the whipping cream with the hand mixer in a chilled mixing bowl until stiff peaks form.

Gently fold the whipped cream into the raspberry mixture. Cover and chill for 25 minutes.

Spoon the filling into the prepared pie shell and chill for at least 4 hours until the filling is firm.


  • Raspberry puree can be refrigerated for up to a week and kept frozen for over a year.
    Use the puree for fruit fillings in crepes and tarts, or combine over low heat with ¼ cup honey for raspberry syrup.
    You can substitute thawed frozen raspberries for the fresh berries if they are out of season.