Gin is an alcohol that derives its flavor from juniper berries. Here, we will look at some of the classic ways people drink this classic spirit and give you recipes to make these cocktails your own.

Things You'll Need


Gin and Tonic

Fill a highball glass with ice.

Measure an ounce of gin and pour into glass.

Measure 0.25 ounces of lime juice and pour into glass.

Measure 3 ounces of tonic and pour into glass.

Garnish with a lime wedge and serve.


Tom Collins

Fill a bar shaker halfway with ice.

Add 1.25 ounces gin, 1 ounce of lemon or lime juice and 1 teaspoon of sour mix.

Shake well.

Fill a Collins glass with ice. Strain contents of shaker into Collins glass. Add a splash of club soda to the glass.

Stir well and garnish with a maraschino cherry and a slice of orange.


Gin Fizz

Fill shaker halfway with ice.

Add 1 ounce lime juice to shaker.

Add 1 teaspoon powdered sugar.

Add 1 1/2 ounces of gin.

Shake and strain into a martini glass. Top it off with carbonated water and stir.


Gibson

Fill shaker halfway with ice.

Fill cocktail glass with ice and allow to sit while assembling drink.

Add 2 ounces gin.

Add two dashes of dry vermouth.

Dump ice out of martini glass and discard ice.

Strain contents of shaker into martini glass.

Garnish with a cocktail onion.


Dry Martini

Fill a shaker halfway with ice.

Pour 1 1/2 ounces dry vermouth into a cocktail glass.

Pour vermouth out of martini glass and discard vermouth.

Pour 2 1/2 ounces gin into shaker.

Strain contents of shaker into martini glass.

Garnish with an olive or lemon twist.


Tips

  • Individual recipies will vary for each of the drinks. Experiment with the ratios of ingredients to see what tastes you or your guests enjoy.

  • Martini recipies also vary greatly, including sweet and dry martinis. We have made a dry martini in the directions above. For extra dry, simply add vermouth to the shaker with the gin. To make a sweet martini, place sweet vermouth in the glass and discard vermouth, then continue with Step 5.

  • A highball glass is distinguished as being a larger tumbler that holds between 8 and 12 ounces of liquid.

  • A Collins glass is tall, like a tumbler, but more narrow. The glass typically holds 8 to 12 ounces of liquor.

  • A martini glass, sometimes referred to as a cocktail glass, features a cone-shaped area to hold the drink. Most have stems, although some do not.

References and Resources

The Bar
Drink Street