Bourbon whiskey is frequently used in savory recipes because when the alcohol cooks out and the remaining liquids and sugar is reduced, a sweet, flavorful glaze is formed. Bourbon reductions make a delectable glaze or sauce for roasted chicken, baked ham, grilled steak, seafood dishes and even mashed potatoes. Cooking alcohol in a pan over medium heat or when in the oven used as a basting liquid or marinade will reduce most of the alcohol through evaporation, but not all. Learn how to properly cook the alcohol out of bourbon by setting it aflame to add wonderful flavor to dishes without any of the harshness or effects of uncooked bourbon whiskey.

Things You'll Need


The Technique

Add bourbon whisky to a hot pan or skillet over medium-high heat. If making a sauce or glaze, cook other ingredients first and add the whisky last. Do not stir.

Carefully light a match.

Quickly touch the flame to the surface of the liquid and remove your hand from the pan. The alcohol will ignite quickly, and the pan will become aflame.The alcohol will be cooked out of the bourbon once the flames die down and go out.

Bourbon Barbeque Glaze

Combine soy sauce, ketchup, brown sugar and garlic powder in a skillet over medium heat, simmering for 10 to 13 minutes, until slightly thickened. Increase the heat to medium-high.

Add 1/2 cup bourbon whisky to the skillet. Do not stir.

Carefully ignite the alcohol with a match.

Allow the flame to die out on its own to fully cook the alcohol out of the mixture.

Simmer for three minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened.

Bourbon Citrus Glaze

Add Worcestershire, soy sauce, brown sugar, orange juice, zest, ginger and chicken stock to a skillet.

Bring the liquid up to a soft boil and then reduce the heat to medium.

Simmer for five to seven minutes, until slightly thickened.

Add 1/2 cup bourbon whiskey to the skillet. Do not stir.

Carefully ignite the alcohol with a match.

Allow the flame to die out on its own to fully cook the alcohol out of the mixture.

Simmer for three to five minutes longer, stirring occasionally, until thickened.

Tips

  • Use a barbeque lighter or fireplace matches to ignite the alcohol. Their length will put a safe distance between you and the flame.

  • Increase the amount of brown sugar in the recipes for a thicker glaze or decrease it for a thinner sauce.

  • Try the Barbeque glaze with pork chops, steaks, grilled chicken and wings.

  • Make the citrus glaze for roasted chicken, baked ham, fish and grilled fruits and vegetables.