Opening or redesigning a salon can be costly, but you can design many key elements of your salon and spend less than you would buying them from a retailer. An overlooked way of achieving this goal is to re-purpose household furniture, whether from your home or from a thrift store. And those with a knowledge of cabinetmaking can build some pieces of salon furniture themselves.


Things You'll Need


While you may not be able to build your own hair dryer, hydraulic-lift styling chair or backwash sinks, you can supply your front desk, backwash cabinetry and stylist stations. Visualize the layout of your salon and the space available. You’ll need to know how many styling stations you require and the dimensions of your backwash cabinetry and front desk.

Keeping in mind your salon’s overall style, look for household furniture you can re-purpose for it. Indoor home bars make great front desks. A tall, skinny dresser can be used as a stylist station; free-standing kitchen cabinetry can be used for storage or as a back bar or backwash station. If your budget is tight, you can find items at thrift stores that can be refinished.

When picking out finishes for your salon furniture, keep in mind that these surfaces will come into contact with hair color, water and hair bleach every day. Dark colors, stainless-steel and stone countertops will hide color stains and stand up to water.

If you cannot find furniture to re-purpose, and you feel confident in your skill at cabinet fabrication, you can build your own cabinetry. Essentially, when building a cabinet, you are building a box, open on one side, with either doors or drawers. Necessary tools include a table or circular saw, a drill, a screwdriver, and hammer and nails or a nail gun. Required materials include sheets of wood for the cabinet’s sides and shelves (if needed), wood putty, screws and drawer pulls.

As with re-purposing, keep in mind what types of finishes will hold up best in your salon environment. Press board and laminate will separate if exposed to water regularly, but sealed wood will hold up rather well if maintained correctly.

References and Resources

How to build a cabinet