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Almond bark is made from white chocolate, which allows it to be dyed a range of colors. Almond bark reacts to liquids by clumping into a unworkable paste, so food coloring in oil, powder or paste form should be used. Two easy ways to add color to almond bark are by melting the chocolate in either a microwave or a double-boiler then adding the color.

Microwave

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Choose the color of food coloring you wish to use.

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Unwrap the almond bark and place the bark in a microwave safe glass bowl.

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Microwave the almond bark for 30 seconds on low heat. Remove it and stir it with a spoon. Alternate microwaving and stirring the almond bark in 30-second increments until it is melted.

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Remove the melted almond bark from the microwave. Stir in the food coloring until the almond bark is thoroughly colored.

Double-boiler Method

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Fill the bottom of a double-boiler with warm water. Place the boiler on the stove.

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Turn the stove to medium-low heat. Add the almond bark to the top pan.

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Stir the almond bark continuously until it melts. Remove the top pan from the stove and set it aside.

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Add the coloring to the melted almond bark.

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Stir in the dye until the almond bark is evenly colored.

Tip

Almond bark has a tendency to harden quickly after being melted; it can be reheated using either method.

Warning

Even a drop of a water-based food coloring will ruin the almond bark by hardening it to a state where it is unable to be melted. Read the ingredients of any food dyes to make sure they are oil-based.

Almond bark will burn more easily than dark chocolate, so it must be continuously stirred during the melting process.

About the Author

Suzanne Burns

Suzanne Burns began writing in 1991 and currently writes for the "Source Weekly" and "Central Oregon Magazine." She has published three poetry collections and one short-story collection. After attending Central Oregon Community College, she left the degree program to become a freelance editor and writer. She has studied creative writing with Sarah Heekin Redfield, Primus St. John and Ken Kesey.