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A face mask isn’t just for adults. Kids enjoy some rest and relaxation as well. Get children involved with creating homemade facial masks, which can encourage their reading, science and math skills, besides providing an opportunity for quality bonding time. Homemade spa treatments are easy to make and kids will enjoy the process.

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Gather the ingredients to create the facial masks and place them on a large work area, such as the kitchen table. Have the children wash their hands and faces.

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Make an oatmeal-based mask by having kids measure and mix 1/4-cup oatmeal with 2 tbsp. of hot water and let sit covered for ten minutes in a plastic container. Mix 1 tbsp. of plain yogurt into the warm oatmeal and let it cool to room temperature before using it as a face mask.

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Create a banana-based mask by mashing one ripe banana in a mixing bowl along with 1 tbsp. of honey. Mix the banana and honey together well with the wooden spoon. Add 1 tbsp. of sour cream and thoroughly incorporate.

Alison Needham/Demand Media

Add 1/2 cup of washed and sliced strawberries in a blender along with 1 tbsp. of honey and 1 tbsp. of plain yogurt and blend to a smooth consistency.

Alison Needham/Demand Media

Apply the face masks and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Wash the masks off with a warm washcloth.

Tip

Unused facial masks can be stored for two to three days in covered plastic containers in the refrigerator.

For a real spa atmosphere, have each child wear a robe and provide sliced cucumbers to place on the children’s eyes while relaxing with their face mask.

Warning

Check with the kids before creating face masks to see if anyone has sensitive skin or is allergic to any of the ingredients.

About the Author

Sarah Lipoff

Sarah Lipoff has been writing since 2008. She has been published through BabyZone, Parents, Funderstanding and Education.com. Lipoff has worked as a K-12 art teacher, museum educator and preschool teacher. She holds a Bachelor of Science in K-12 art education from St. Cloud State University.