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Avocados are rich in vitamins, fat, protein and natural oils that can coat and soften the hair. The fruit's oil forms a protective barrier that keeps the hair hydrated, soft and flexible. You can apply avocado to damaged hair once or twice a week to improve its texture and sheen. You'll only see results, however, if you avoid the practices that damaged your hair in the first place. Do not wash with harsh shampoos or use heated styling tools every day, and avoid excessive exposure to the sun, wind and water.

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Cut open the avocado lengthwise, and separate the two halves. Remove the seed from the center, and peel the fruit with a sharp kitchen knife.

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Place the avocado in a small mixing bowl, and mash lightly with the back of a fork. Add the olive oil, and stir until smooth and well combined.

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Massage the mixture into your scalp using circular motions with your fingertips. Continue working the avocado into your hair, all the way down to the tips.

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Put on a plastic shower cap, and then wrap your head in a warm, damp towel. The heat allows the oil and protein to penetrate the hair shaft and condition from the inside out.

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Allow the avocado to remain on your hair for at least 20 minutes. Remove the towel and shower cap, rinse well with warm water, and shampoo as usual to remove any oily residue.

Tip

Purchase ripe avocados that are firm, heavy and free of bruises or blemishes. According to the California Avocado Commission, ripe fruits will yield to gentle pressure when lightly squeezed in the palm of the hand.

Add five drops essential oil of rosemary or lavender to the avocado mixture for added conditioning, if desired.

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About the Author

Willow Sidhe

Willow Sidhe is a freelance writer living in the beautiful Hot Springs, AR. She is a certified aromatherapist with a background in herbalism. She has extensive experience gardening, with a specialty in indoor plants and herbs. Sidhe's work has been published on numerous Web sites, including Gardenguides.com.