6 Easy-To-Maintain Indoor Plants & Flowers

By Chelsea Becker

Having house plants is the "in thing" to do right now, and why not? They add color and character to any space and even have health benefits. There's no doubt that some plants are easier to maintain than others though. Which is why this is your go-to list if you want to spruce up your space with plants or flowers, but are worried your green thumb hasn't quite blossomed yet.

6 Easy-to-maintain Indoor Flowers + Plants
credit: Unsplash

Sansevieria (Snake Plant)

The snake plant is a super trendy option. You can find it at almost any nursery in various sizes. It's also ideal for the plant novice because of its easy care. It can thrive in several different lighting scenarios (near a north-facing window is optimal, but not necessary) and only needs watering when the pot is completely dry. When you do water it, you want to give it what's called a "deep watering" meaning the water fills all of the soil and drips through the draining hole.

Ficus Elastica (Rubber Plant)

The fiddle fig ficus has gotten so much attention lately, and although it's a beautiful plant, it's not the best option to start with because of its high price tag and delicate care. If you're hooked on getting a ficus though, the rubber plant is your best bet. It's very eye-catching and instructions for care are pretty basic. Keep it in a room with bright light, but not direct. Water it every week or so, maybe even less (keep an eye on the leaves, if they're droopy, water a little more frequently) and mist or wipe down the leaves with a damp cloth so they keep their luster.

Saintpaulia Ionantha (African Violet)

If you're looking for more of an indoor flower versus just a green plant, this is a great option. It's practically made for beginners, and flowers pretty much all year, especially if kept near a window with a sheer curtain. All you have to remember is to pour water directly onto the soil (every other day-ish, keeping it moist) because the leaves do not like it. You'll also want to use lukewarm water versus cold (this is a good tip for most plants).

Crassula Ovata (Jade Plant)

Jade plants are great options if you're more into succulents. You only need to water them when the soil is completely dry, so not very often, and give them lots of sunlight. You'll know if your jade plant isn't getting enough of either because its growth will stunt or it may become leggy. Another good succulent option for the beginner is aloe vera, which has very similar care requirements as the jade plant.

Philodendron

If your house or apartment is in desperate need of a palm-leafed plant to take up space in a bare corner, the philodendron is your plant. Philodendrons are incredibly adaptable, which is what makes them a great option for newbie plant owners. You'll want to water this plant a little more frequently—when about the top inch of the soil is dry—and also pay attention to the fertilizer schedule (it needs extra fertilization in the spring and summer).

Schlumbergera (Christmas Cactus)

This list absolutely had to include a cactus. They are notoriously easy house plants and have also earned a spot on the trendy list. A Christmas cactus is a little more decorative and a good option if you're wanting flowers or a little bit of color other than green. You can move this cactus between the outdoors and in, but of course only when it's warm. Keep the soil moist and make sure it's getting at least six hours of indirect sunlight a day and you'll be good to go!