Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Making smoked venison summer sausage is easy, but it takes time. The meat must be cured for several days and the smoking process takes hours. Curing the meat helps preserve it. Smoking cooks it slowly and imparts flavor. There are hundreds of variations on smoked venison sausage. Garlic, liquid smoke, pepper and even ground bacon add accents to the meat. This variation is easy to do and doesn't require that the sausage be stuffed into casings.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Mix the ingredients and then refrigerate the mixture, covered, for three days. Once a day, take the mixture out of the refrigerator and mix it thoroughly. Return the mix to the fridge.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Remove the venison mixture from the fridge and form it into 2½-inch diameter rolls about 6 inches long. Cover and refrigerate for four hours.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Preheat the smoker to 140 degrees Fahrenheit and add the hickory chips. The amount of hickory you add depends on your personal preference. Add a scant handful for a mild flavor. A cupful will provide a stronger hickory taste.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Raise the temperature in the smoker to 160 degrees F after two hours, then raise the temperature again to 175 degrees after another two hours.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Smoke the sausage at 175 degrees F until the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees F. Remove the sausage from the smoker and rinse it in cold water. Let it dry.

Kris Robertson/Demand Media

Serve the meat immediately or refrigerate it. Freeze venison sausage that won't be used within a week.

Tip

If you don't have a smoker, the sausage can be cooked in a skillet or baked in the oven. Add a teaspoon of liquid smoke. Make a stovetop smoker with a covered roasting pan. Put hickory chips on the bottom and use a rack to hold the meat, then cover it. The heat from the stove should cause the hickory chips to smoke. Use equal amounts of ground beef, pork and venison to temper the strong taste of deer meat.

About the Author

Meg Jernigan

Meg Jernigan has been writing for more than 30 years. She specializes in travel, cooking and interior decorating. Her offline credits include copy editing full-length books and creating marketing copy for nonprofit organizations. Jernigan attended George Washington University, majoring in speech and drama.