The smooth texture of liquid sugar, streaming in to a recipe or drizzling over a favorite dish, adds a great deal of sweetness to foods. This is the means of creating caramel, a topping utilized in a number of desserts throughout the world. After it cools, the sugar will become hard again, or can be maintained in its liquid form by the addition of other ingredients, such as cream. When liquefied, the versatility of sugar is multiplied, and the taste becomes richer.

Things You'll Need


Pour the sugar evenly into the saucepan. Shake the pan several times to ensure the layer becomes even.

Place the saucepan on the stove. Turn the burner to medium heat.

Allow the sugar to begin turning dark around the edges. Once it has liquefied slightly around the rim, move it to the middle to prevent burning.

Stir continuously after one-quarter of the pot has turned to caramel. Turn the temperature down to medium low.

Cook the liquefied sugar, while stirring, until it has completely melted.

Remove the sugar from the stove and use it as you desire. If you want, at this stage add butter or cream to the liquefied sugar to create a sauce or a creamier liquid.

Tips

  • If you just desire a sweet taste without the extra flavor of caramel, just melt the sugar until it is a liquid. If you continue to stir, and as the liquid turns brown, more favor is added.

  • A candy thermometer can be used as a guide – insert it when the sugar liquifies and proceed to remove the caramel when it reaches between 235 and 240 degrees F.