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Lobster is one of the most delicious meats in the world; it is also one of the most difficult meats to prepare at home. Many home cooks cringe at the idea of boiling a live lobster. Fortunately, there are other options available, such as purchasing frozen lobster tails and cooking them. This circumvents the necessity of killing a live lobster, and it saves money by just purchasing the meatiest part of the lobster. The best way to cook lobster that has been frozen is to steam it. Steaming cooks the lobster yet keeps it from drying out.

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Defrost the lobster tails in your refrigerator for 8-10 hours or overnight. Never defrost lobster in the microwave or it will dry and become the consistency of rubber.

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Fill the steamer pot until the water comes one inch below the steamer basket when it is fitted into the pot. If you add too much water you will boil the lobster instead of steaming it. Heat the water in the steamer pot until it is boiling and insert the steamer basket.

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Insert a wooden skewer lengthwise through each lobster tail. This prevents the lobster tails from curling up during the steaming process.

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Place the lobster tails in the steamer basket and cover the basket. Allow them to steam for 5-7 minutes, or 1 minute per pound of lobster. You will know when the lobster is done when the shell turns bright red and the flesh is white.

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Remove the lobster and run each tail under cool water. This will stop the tails from overcooking and drying out.

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Cut along the length of each lobster tail with kitchen scissors. Crack open the shell, and remove the membrane. Serve the tails piping hot with drawn butter.

Warning

Be very careful when opening the lobster tails; the meat will be steaming hot. Avoid contact with the meat or the steam to prevent burns.

About the Author

Natalie Smith, Ph.D.

Natalie Smith is a technical writing professor specializing in medical writing localization and food writing. Her work has been published in technical journals, on several prominent cooking and nutrition websites, as well as books and conference proceedings. Smith has won two international research awards for her scholarship in intercultural medical writing, and holds a PhD in technical communication and rhetoric.