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Bratwurst is a type of German sausage containing pork or veal. In Germany, bratwurst styles vary from region to region -- some regions use marjoram as a primary seasoning, while others use nutmeg. In the United States, bratwurst is typically made with ground pork, coriander and marjoram. Bratwurst, also called "brats," are usually braised or grilled. However, cooking brats in a pressure cooker is comparatively simple and allows for a reduction in cooking time.

Place the pressure cooker on a burner set to high. Pour water or beer in the pressure cooker. If cooking 4 to 6 bratwursts, use 2 cups of liquid. Season the liquid with salt, pepper, garlic powder or red pepper flakes if desired.

Set the lid on top of the pressure cooker. Twist the lid until firmly locked. If your pressure cooker is equipped with additional locks or latches, make sure you properly secure them. Once the steam vent begins emitting steam and the regulator begins rattling, lower the heat setting from high to medium.

Allow the bratwursts to cook for 10 minutes over medium heat. Remove the pressure cooker from heat, and place it on a cutting board or cold burner. Remove the lid after pressure cooker's steam vent is no longer emitting steam.

Tip

If you're cooking more than 4 to 6 bratwursts, add enough liquid to the pressure cooker to cover the bratwursts. However, do not fill the cooker beyond its fill line.

Brats are particularly popular in Wisconsin, where they are often braised in lager-style beer and cooked with green peppers and onions. If desired, add sliced green peppers and onions to the liquid.

Warning

It is only safe to remove a pressure cooker's lid when the steam vent no longer emits steam -- this typically takes 10 to 15 minutes after taking the cooker off the heat source.

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About the Author

Andrine Redsteer

Andrine Redsteer's writing on tribal gaming has been published in "The Guardian" and she continues to write about reservation economic development. Redsteer holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from the University of Washington, a Master of Arts in Native American studies from Montana State University and a Juris Doctor from Seattle University School of Law.