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Whichever way you cook it, a chuck tender roast is one of the more tender cuts of beef available. The chuck section of beef comes from the shoulder and neck area, which contains high amounts of fat, making it flavorful and juicy. Chuck tender roast, which is cut from this section is often used to make pot roast, either the braised version on the stove or roasted in the oven. Both methods result in very tender and tasty beef dish.

Braised

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Season the chuck tender roast generously with salt and pepper.

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Heat 2 tbsp. of olive oil in a large Dutch oven pot on the stove over medium-high heat.

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Place the chuck roast into the Dutch oven and brown all sides of the meat, about five minutes on each side.

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Lift up the chuck roast with a large fork and add the chopped onions to the bottom of the Dutch oven. Set the chuck roast on top.

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Add 1/2 cup red wine and cover the Dutch oven.

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Reduce the heat to low and allow the meat to simmer in the red wine for 3 1/2 to 4 hours, basting the meat with the liquid in the pot ever half-hour or so. The beef is ready when you can easily flake it with a fork.

Oven Roast

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Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Season the chuck roast with salt and pepper. You may add additional spices and herbs as you see fit.

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Brown all sides of the roast in a large skillet or Dutch oven on medium heat.

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Place the roast in a baking pan lined with heavy-duty foil and sprayed with cooking oil and add 3/4 cup beef broth to the pan.

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Cover the pan with a lid and bake the chuck tender roast in the oven at 350 for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until it's tender enough to flake with a fork.

Tip

For best results, remove the chuck tender roast from the refrigerator to come to room temperature at least 2 hours before you start cooking.

Use a meat thermometer to check the meat is done, if you are not sure. The roast should be cooked to at least 145 degrees Fahrenheit for medium and 160 degrees Fahrenheit for well done.

About the Author

Zora Hughes

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.