Known for their potatoes, Idaho grows a vast variety that includes russets, Yukon gold, fingerlings, blues and purples. Potatoes grown in the state carry an official state seal stating “Idaho Potatoes.” The Idaho potato most people associate with the state is brown and elongated with a firm texture and in the russet family. They work well baked, fried, steamed, or boiled. When selecting potatoes to use for boiling, use potatoes that are firm, free of cuts, splits or bruises. Always trim any green areas off the potato before boiling, as it can lead to a bitter taste.

Things You'll Need


Cold Water Boiling

Scrub the potato to remove any dirt particles. Run cold water over the potato and use a dishcloth or nylon scrubber to clean the potato. Do not soak the potatoes, as it removes nutrients and flavor.

Fill an appropriate-size cooking pot with cool water, stock or milk. Boiling the potatoes in stock or milk adds flavor and sweetness to the cooked potatoes.

Add the potatoes to the pot and place it on the stove. Heat the liquid on high until boiling and turn the heat to medium, continuing a low boil. Leaving the skin on the potatoes while boiling will retain its flavor and nutritional value.

Boil the potatoes for approximately 25 minutes or until done. Poke the potato with a fork or knife and if it slips easily in and out, it is ready to eat or use in a recipe.

Peel the potatoes after they have cooled enough to handle. Peel away a thin layer of outer skin if boiled in milk.

Hot Water Boiling

Scrub the potato with a dishcloth or nylon scrubber to remove any dirt. Rinse the potato off in water.

Fill an appropriate-size cooking pot with water. Add 1 teaspoon of salt to the water.

Place the pot on the stove and allow the water to boil. Turn the temperature down to medium.

Add the Idaho potatoes to the boiling water and boil for approximately 25 minutes or until done. Poke the potato with a fork or knife and if it slips easily in and out, it is ready to eat or use in a recipe.