Green tea has long been a go-to when that emergency mid-day caffeine thirst strikes or when we just need a little TLC to soothe our troubles away. It's hard not to love green tea with benefits such as improved brain function and lowered risk of certain cancers, among others. It's become a mainstream MVP in the tea world because when you think of green tea, you think of improved health.

But what if we told you that green tea can help stomach problems as well? Believe it or not, it's true. This mighty green tea just got mightier, and it's making all the other teas in the world green with envy. Before reaching for the Pepto-Bismol, go for green tea instead. Yes, really, and here's why.

Green tea for upset stomach

Move over, peppermint and ginger tea—green tea is making a name for itself in the business of soothing upset stomachs. This is because green tea contains high levels of polyphenols (a dose of 50 to 150 milligrams, to be exact), which are the micronutrients we get from plants that help treat certain digestive issues.

The next time you have an upset stomach or a stomach ache, go ahead and brew a cup of green tea (around three to four per day). If you're sensitive to caffeine, you might want to limit this amount. Be sure to avoid drinking it close to bedtime, as the caffeine could keep you up at night. Anxiety sufferers might also want to consider a caffeine-free option if possible, as too much caffeine can cause an increase in anxiety.

Green tea for gas

Whether we like to admit it or not, we all deal with embarrassing gas. If you want to go on smelling like a rose, take preventative action by making green tea part of your daily routine. "Try not to go for the popular brands because it hasn't been proven that they work or are authentic. Instead, opt for the Chinese or Vietnamese variety," says Dr. Ritika Samaddar, nutritionist at Max Healthcare in New Delhi.

It's also useful to drink a cup of green tea after a meal, especially if you overdid it. "Catechins, the major bioactive component found in green tea, provide many pharmacologic properties that help to soothe the gastrointestinal tract and reduce intestinal gas that causes bloating," says Emily Kyle, a registered dietitian and nutritionist. "Some studies suggest that drinking green tea may even offer relief for many digestive disorders that are commonly associated with bloating such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease."

Additional green tea benefits for the stomach

  1. A healthier alternative to coffee: If you find yourself reaching for that third or fourth coffee of the day, try a cup of green tea instead. It still has caffeine (about 25 milligrams per 8-ounce serving), but it's less harsh on your stomach compared to the brown stuff (thus creating less brown stuff, if you catch our drift).

  2. Better dental health: Sip your way to healthier teeth as catechin, the chemical compound mentioned earlier and found in green tea, can help eliminate the bacteria that increases the risk of tooth decay, throat infections, and gum disease. There was even a study that took 940 men and examined their dental health. It was found that those who drank green tea regularly had better oral hygiene. 

  3.  It's rich in antioxidants: This powerhouse drink is rich with antioxidants, which can reduce cancer and help you live longer. Enough said. 

Green tea is a common tea staple found in many households around the world and, after learning about all these benefits, it's for a good reason. Next time you have an upset stomach, skip the peppermint or ginger and reach for a cup of green tea instead. You'll have all the other teas in your cabinet green with envy.

About the Author

Sarah Kester

Sarah is a writer, editor and cat mom. Lover of wine, rom-coms, and all things self-care, she’s inspired by mindfulness and helping others feel balanced in their lives through meditation, self-love and self-care. After all, what's balance without Saturday morning yoga and green juice and a glass of rosé later that evening? She has written for The Greatest, Elite Daily, YourTango, Vital Proteins, among others. To learn more, you can find her at her website sarahkester.com.