Whether you enjoy fresh figs mixed into a salad or dried figs as an afternoon snack, you’re getting a number of vitamins from this slightly sweet fruit. Because of its small size, a single fig doesn’t play a huge role in helping you reach the recommended daily amount of any specific vitamin. Eating more than one fig, however, improves your vitamin intake.


Vitamin A

Vitamin A contributes to your overall health by supporting your vision and strengthening your skin and bones. Women should get 2,333 international units of vitamin A per day and men should get 3,000 international units daily. A large, raw fig has 91 international units of vitamin A; providing about 4 percent of the recommended dietary allowance for women and 3 percent for men. Dried figs are lower in this vitamin, with just 1 international unit per dried fig.

Vitamin K

A diet high in Vitamin K helps your blood clot properly and can contribute to bone strength. Women and men should get 90 micrograms of this vitamin per day. One large, raw fig has 3 micrograms of vitamin K, which accounts for about 3 percent of the recommended dietary allowance. One dried fig is lower in vitamin K, with just 1.3 micrograms, which is slightly more than 1 percent of the recommended dietary allowance.

Vitamin C

Regular intake of vitamin C helps your immune system, promotes cell health and can even reduce your risk of cancer. Women should get 75 milligrams of vitamin C per day and men should get 90 milligrams. One large, raw fig has 1.3 milligrams of vitamin C, providing about 2 percent of the recommended dietary allowance for women and 1 percent for men. Dried figs are significantly lower in vitamin C; to get just 1.8 milligrams, you’d need to eat a full cup of the fruit.

Other Nutrients

Beyond their content of vitamins A, K and C, figs contain very low levels of other vitamins such as thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate and vitamin E. This fruit also contains minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and zinc.