The original skinhead girls appeared in the United Kingdom in the late 1960’s. Their style was influenced by the mods of the earlier part of the decade, but with a working-class feel. An even edgier version of the look emerged in the 1980’s revival of the skinhead movement, often with a more punk influence.



Most Popular Styles

The most common trait of a skinhead girl hairstyle is its smoothness. It is usually worn very straight and close to the head. Often, the hair is cut to either just below chin length or just above shoulder length.

Bangs

With a nod to her 60’s predecessor, the skinhead girl usually wears very short bangs. Often, they’re cut to about an inch above the eyebrows. Unlike Bettie Page-style bangs, however, they’re usually choppy-looking.

Shorter Styles

Some skinhead girls wear their hair much shorter. The feathercut, or Chelsea, involves cutting most of the hair short, with fringes at certain spots. Longer pieces frame the face and the back of the head, while the hair is cut shorter at the ears.

Supershort Styles

One version of the Chelsea is more punk-oriented. This style is shaved, either super-short like a buzz cut or completely bald. Short bangs give a feminine touch, and some skinhead girls wear a fringe at the back of the head, as well as at the sides of the face, like girly sideburns.

Skinhead Style Stigma

Although the skinhead movement’s reputation has been tarnished by neo-Nazi offshoots, skinhead style originated with the Rude Boy, a term for a young Jamaican (i.e., black) man who dressed in the latest fashions. The skinhead girl still sports a feminine version of the style that celebrated West Indian music and Rude Boy fashion at the end of the 60’s.