Omega, a Swiss manufacturer of luxury watches, debuted its first product, the Gurzelen Patent pocket watch, in 1885. Since each watch Omega manufactures is the result of heavy artistic planning and because its standards of quality are so rigorous, its products often are imitated by copycats who create substandard versions for equal or discounted prices. It’s important to be able to spot a fake Omega watch, so you don’t end up paying hundreds or even thousands of dollars for poor quality.

Things You'll Need

Assess the luminosity and glow of the watch, authentic Omega watches use a particular substance called “LumiNova” on the dial, hands and other areas of their watches. Fake Omega watches will not glow as brightly in the dark. Instead they may emit a faint glow or no glow at all.

Look at the spelling of every piece of written text on the watch. Due to the fact that knock-off Omega watches often have poor quality control, words aren’t always proofread or checked. A misspelled word, no matter how small the error, is an absolute sign that a watch is a fake.

Use a jeweler’s loupe or a magnifying glass to examine the dial and, if there, the date wheel. You need some degree of magnification to aptly assess if the letters and numbers are printed with the absolute crispest precision, if they look a bit blurry or if there is slight overlap between the characters. Such workmanship would not pass Omega quality standards and is most likely a fake.

Use a jeweler’s loupe or magnifying glass to search for contaminants. Due to the fact that there are poor standards of workmanship in factories that specialize in fake Omega watches, dirt, dust or hairs can be found under the frame or glass. Look carefully.