Sisterlocks is a dreadlock-like hairstyle for black women that enhances their natural hair texture. The difference between Sisterlocks and traditional dreadlocks is the manner in which the locks are created. Rather than starting at the scalp and working down to the ends of the hair, to form Sisterlocks you begin working at the ends of the hair, upward toward the head. With information and practice, you can keep your Sisterlocks in great condition and looking consistently attractive.

Employ the use of a hair stylist who is educated and experienced with Sisterlocks. This hairstyle is a commitment that must not be undertaken lightly. Although there is a six-month window after the initial creation of your locks when they can be removed, after that time you will need to have you hair cut in order to remove the locks. An experienced stylist can advise you and help you make a informed decision when choosing this style.

Adhere to a nighttime ritual that enhances the appearance of your Sisterlocks. How you care for your hair when sleeping is just as important as how you treat it during waking hours. Section your hair as you would in its natural state, and braid it to prevent tangling as you sleep. Tie hair up with a satin scarf or use a satin pillowcase to reduce breakage and frizz-causing friction.

Visit your stylist for the first two shampoo sessions after having your hair locked. During these visits your stylist will inspect the progress of your locks. Some retightening may be necessary, as your hair is adapting to the new style. After these initial salon sessions, you should wash your Sisterlocks at least once a week using a residue-free shampoo to decrease the amount of product buildup. Choose one of several shampoos on the market or ask your stylist for a recommendation.

Visit your stylist every four to six weeks. As a permanent hairstyle, Sisterlocks require constant tightening and maintenance that can only be done by a trained specialist. It is possible to take courses to become certified on the Sisterlock process, but even upon receiving certification, it is probably easier to have them cared for by another professional.