Dreadlocks can be a fashion statement, fun, spiritual or just a new style, and even white girls can have them despite differences in hair quality. Dreadlocks are a very specific hair style but, while some types of hair do dread easier than others, anyone can have dreadlocks. It takes some time for the dreadlocks to really set, but you can get them started and have the look of a head full of dreadlocks in a few short hours with the right process.

Things You'll Need

Wash your hair with a residue free shampoo. Residue from hair products will remain on the hair and cause it to be more difficult to create and maintain the dreadlocks.

Towel dry the hair.

Section the hair before beginning to form dreads. Part the hair down the middle and put half of it into a clip. Work on half of the head at a time. Part the remaining side into two sections, a top and bottom. Put one section in a clip. Piece the remaining section into small squares to form the dreads. For thinner hair, usually a 1-inch square is a good size, this makes a dread about the size of a No. 2 pencil. If your hair is thicker, make the squares smaller. Separate out square sections with the comb and wrap a rubber band around the hair to secure it. Continue to make sections until that half is done, then repeat for the other half of the head.

Bend forward so you hair is hanging down and spray on the accelerator spray. This is not always a required step, but for finer hair it helps the process. Follow the specific instructions on your brand of accelerator as to how much and how close to spray.

Start forming dreads with a piece from the back on the bottom. Remove the rubber band. Grasp the strands in your hand, running them between your index finger and thumb and across your palm. Place the comb up close to the scalp on the hair and push upwards. Allow the comb to push and pack the hair close up to the scalp. Roll the hair in your fingers as you comb to release individual hairs and help with the twisting motion.

Work all the way to the bottom of the hair, continuing to push the hair up and pack it together with the comb. Turn the dread in you hand and comb it up in all directions as you work. When that dread is complete place a rubber band on the very end to hold the dread until it “matures” and is trained. Once dreads mature they hold themselves together.

Move on to the next section and continue back combing the dreads until they are all formed. Check them all over carefully to make sure they are fully packed and back combed and no loose areas have worked out where the hair is easily parted.

Take a small amount of wax, about the size of a pencil eraser, and rub it together between your thumb and forefinger to warm and loosen it. Apply to the first two or three inches of the dread. Work it in well until you can’t feel it anymore. Get another dab of wax the same size and continue waxing down the dread until it is completely waxed. The wax should not feel heavy or sticky, it should work into the hair. Roll the dread back and forth in your palms and lock the hair into the wax. Wax all the remaining dreads.

Roll your dreads every day and add wax on those where you can no longer feel any. Twist any stray ends up into the tips to form blunt ends. When the dreads are mature and stable you can remove the rubber bands.

Wash your dreads gently in residue-free shampoo every three days, or at least once a week. Clean dreads lock up faster than dirty ones, and contrary to rumor dreads are very clean and sanitary if well maintained. Add wax as necessary when the dread feels dry and you can’t detect any wax.