Wine bottles come in many shapes and sizes. Each bottle has its own name, which can depend on the contents of the bottle. Aside from the standard sizes, other bottle sizes may be used for specific types of wine or in certain regions, based on their own wine production traditions.


Pony

Sometimes known as a “piccolo,” a small 187.5-ml (6.3 fl. oz.) bottle is 1/4 of a standard bottle of wine.

Half

A half-bottle, or split, is 375 ml (12.7 fl. oz.).

Standard

A standard wine bottle is 750 ml (25.4 fl. oz.).

Magnum

A magnum is equivalent to two standard bottles of wine, or 1.5 L (50.7 fl. oz.).

Marie-Jean

At 2.25-liters (76 fl. oz.), Marie-Jean is the equivalent of three standard wine bottles.

Jeroboam

Also known as a double magnum, a jeroboam may refer to two different bottle sizes. A Jeroboam of Burgundy or Champagne is the equivalent of four standard bottles, or 3 liters (101 fl. oz.). A Jeroboam of Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon is the equivalent of six standard bottles, or 4.5 liters (152 fl. oz.).

Rehoboam

A Rehoboam is the equivalent of six standard bottles, or 4.5 liters (152 fl. oz.) — the same size as a Jeroboam of Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon.

Imperial or Methuselah

A 6-liter (203 fl. oz.) bottle of Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon is known as an Imperial, while the same size containing Champagne or Burgundy is a Methuselah. Both are the equivalent of eight standard wine bottles.

Larger Bottles

Some larger bottles are used mainly for Champagne and Burgundy. A Salmanazar contains 9 liters (12 standard bottles), a Balthazar contains 12 liters (16 bottles) and a Nebuchadnezzar measures in at 15 liters (20 bottles).